Tag Archives: cancer screening

No pain, no gain?


To view this blog at my blog’s website where you can sign up to be notified and read other posts relevant to prostate cancer, click here.

One of my patients last week had a heartfelt discussion regarding the survival benefit of ADT vs his quality of life. He enjoys body building and showed me some pretty dramatic pictures of himself during his last ADT cycle (on intermittent therapy) versus now, when he had been off treatment for ~6-9 months. Added to his concern was his decline in libido and sexual function during ADT, a common complaint especially among younger patients. The question of quality vs quantity of life was,of course, utmost on his mind.

Starting from the initial diagnosis, every (maybe that should be every !!) prostate cancer patient will experience a decrement in quality of life. Those who elect “watchful waiting” will nevertheless experience anxiety regarding the shadow of CANCER following their footsteps. Sure, you can put it out of your mind, but turn around and there it is, like the neighbor’s unwanted cat stalking you. Then there is the anxiety over what the next PSA will be. And if on active surveillance, what will that next biopsy show?? These issues are both real, disturbing, and often under-appreciated in the discussions surrounding screening…”we should still be screening, but not treat the men who don’t need it…” Really? What about the 80% of men who die at age 90 with prostate cancer at autopsy who never had to deal with the shadow? (The inevitable counter-argument is, “yes, and what about those who had early detection of a high grade cancer whose life was saved?”)

We also tend to ignore the impact of competing mortality in our discussions. “Sure you had a stent placed last year, and you already survived that small colon cancer, so why wouldn’t we be aggressive in treating this new problem?” Dr. Sartor provided an elegant discussion of this in an editorial on the PIVOT trial you can read here. Whatever the flaws in that study, it remains clear that we are not very good at predicting the non-prostate cancer “future” for our patients, and the older you are, the thinner the ice gets regardless of how many marathons you run.

When patients choose one form of primary treatment vs another, they are weighing the different side effect profiles of surgery or radiation as much as which is “most effective”. I often give patients a copy of this article from NEJM and encourage them to spend some time looking at the graphics in Figure 1 to get some idea of what they will face in the way of side effects from treatment. As any honest physician would tell them, treatment will involve side effects, some permanent, in the best of circumstances.

In the setting of more advanced disease, for example a patient who presents with metastases outside the pelvis, the recent CHAARTED and STAMPEDE trials both suggest an advantage to the earlier use of docetaxel chemotherapy in combination with ADT as opposed to ADT alone. These data suggest that “pay me now or pay me later” analysis favors the “pay me now” approach in terms of overall survival. But at what price for quality of life? Fortunately most chemotherapy side effects are reversible, but distinctly unpleasant, potentially making the equation something like “4 months of misery to provide 14 months of longer life….not all of which will be great anyway”.

Even in the very advanced setting, there is some evidence that greater toxicity results in improved survival. A recent analysis of the TROPIC trial of cabazitaxel suggested that the patients who had the most “toxic response” in terms of dropping their neutrophil count benefited the most in terms of overall survival.

While all of this seems incredibly negative (for which I apologize), the history of oncology as a field has been the incremental improvement in survival AND the development of newer treatments that provide such advances with diminishing toxicity. Pediatric leukemia, as discussed extensively in “The Emperor of All Maladies” is a great example of how pioneering patients and physicians worked together to find cures and reduce side effects. We may only be at the beginning of such achievement in prostate cancer, but with the advent of the newer hormonal and imaging agents, increasingly sophisticated surgery and radiation, vaccines and immunotherapy, and even the chemotherapies now available, we have  no doubt reached the end of the beginning. Onward!

10 Comments

Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues, Prostate cancer therapy

Yay…Movember is here. Let’s kick Pca


Hi friends and relatives (those who will admit it…),

This Movember, I’ve committed my upper lip to help change the face of men’s health by growing a moustache, now I need your support at http://mobro.co/michaelglode.The Movember Foundation is the leading global organization committed to changing the face of men’s health. I’m passionate about this cause because too many men are dying unnecessarily from prostate cancer. In 2014, more than 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Even better, join our team and donate to yourself and invite your friends/family to the cause! Our team is here: http://us.movember.com/mospace/index/search/?q=university%20colorado

 The Movember Foundation is working tirelessly with an urgent goal in mind: accelerating breakthroughs in prostate cancer research that will benefit patients and their families. Movember is achieving this with the formation of the largest, global alliance of prostate cancer researchers and clinical specialists, who are tackling the toughest prostate cancer challenges. I had the privilege of hearing the updates on the research they have been sponsoring last week at the PCF retreat. More progress in the last 5 years than in the previous 25. Take a look there for updates/posts yourself!

I need your support to fund this important work. Together, we can create a world where no man dies of prostate cancer.

You can donate by:

– Donating online at http://mobro.co/michaelglode (and follow the pathetic growth of my not-so-manly moustache…)

– Writing a check to ‘Movember’, referencing my registration ID: 5798901 and mailing it to:  Movember, P.O. Box 1595, Culver City, CA 90232

You can learn more about the important work and impact Movember is having at: http://us.movember.com/programsThere’s a lot riding on this moustache, thank you for your support!

 Mo Bro Michael Glode

http://mobro.co/michaelglode

1 Comment

Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues

What is going to kill me? – the cloudy crystal ball


To view this post in my blog allowing you to sign up and make comments, please click here.

With an intense focus on prostate cancer, it is easy to overlook the reality of other causes of death or disability in making decisions about therapy. An example of this issue is the proliferation of molecular tests that have been validated to separate patients with “intermediate risk”, or “low risk” into “even lower” or “even higher” risk disease categories using a number of different gene expression profiles on the tumor or biopsy material. For example, Genomic Health offers the Oncotype Dx test that provides a “Genomic Prostate Score” that gives a patient who (based on clinical criteria such as PSA and number of biopsy cores positive) falls into a low or intermediate risk category another lab value (GPS) that can potentially be useful in making a decision about treatment. GenomeDx has a test that can evaluate high risk men after prostatectomy to more accurately predict metastatic disease at 5 years. There is a very balanced article on the challenges of using these tests (which are a potential step forward to be sure) in the real world of the clinic here.

However, in all of the excitement and marketing of these and other tests, a couple of key facts are often overlooked (and may be much more important in decision making). Prostate cancer is generally a slow disease anyway. Competing mortality looms large as patients get older. And most importantly, there are validated ways to put the “whole patient” into the picture before ordering these tests, whether they be a PSA, biopsy, or molecular analysis. The Charlson comorbidity index can be extremely useful in predicting survival and is barely ever mentioned in the molecular analysis literature/reports. It is a simple yes/no answer to whether a patient has any of these 12 conditions: diabetes, bleeding gastrointestinal ulcer, chronic lung disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, angina or chest pain, cirrhosis or liver disease, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, hypertension, and depression. In a lovely article published last year, the use of this analysis in relationship to prostate cancer mortality gave a vivid picture of prostate cancer mortality in the larger setting of 3533 men with prostate cancer. A snapshot of their data looks like this:

Screen Shot 2014-06-19 at 9.15.54 AM

Very often, the comorbid conditions lead to death from another cause. In my opinion (and in my practice), we too often ignore our ability to quantify the risk of dying from “something else” when we focus so intensely on the PSA or other tests in counseling patients about what to do. It is also true that patient perception of test results can vary dramatically. One patient with a “GPS score” of 10 might be reassured, while another will perceive it as “not low enough” and opt for aggressive treatment rather than observation. To some extent this exposes the fallacy of “we need to separate the issue of treatment from that of diagnosis” thinking. Until the crystal ball becomes crystal clear, management of prostate cancer will remain challenging and requires the kind of wholistic thinking that is often better done by primary care physicians or public health professionals than by prostate cancer docs, or their patients.

7 Comments

Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues

No surgery or radiation. Just make my PSA go down!


To read this blog on the website and have access to subscribing and older posts click here. What if you could avoid all of the well-known side effects of surgery or radiation and just take hormone therapy? (aka Androgen Deprivation Therapy or ADT) Given the incredible power of the PSA value to drive thinking of both physicians and patients, this question makes a lot of sense. >95% of patients will have a PSA response to ADT, usually in the form of GnRH agonists (e.g. Lupron, Zoladex, Trelstar, etc) or antagonists (Firmagon, Plenaxis) You might imagine that dropping the PSA would be all that is needed in some men and if they didn’t have too many side effects (weight gain, hot flashes, muscle weakness) they would benefit from the treatment.

A study just reported looked at 3435 men treated in this way between 1995 and 2008 to determine if such treatment would reduce death from prostate cancer and compared them to 11735 men who did not receive such treatment. The age ranged from 35 to >80 and as you might suspect, there was a statistically significant tendency to use treatment in older individuals, in men with higher PSA at diagnosis, and in those with higher Gleason scores. Anyone who received radiation or surgery within the first year after treatment was excluded from the analysis. The bottom line is that there was no effect of using such treatment. To quote the authors, “Our main conclusion is that PADT does not seem to be an effective strategy as an alternative to no therapy among men diagnosed with clinically localized PCa who are not receiving curative-intent therapy. The risks of serious adverse events and the high costs associated with its use mitigate against any clinical or policy rationale for PADT use in these men.”

This study adds to the complexities surrounding prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Screening and treating patients with surgery or radiation after age 65 may not produce any positive results in the large screening studies, or at the least, you have to treat a significant number of men who would not need treatment to save one life. While you can make the PSA go down with ADT, it also does not save any lives. Such is the challenge of whom to diagnose, whom to treat, and how to best treat anyone who you think does need treatment. On this blog you will find many entries on these issues, and as I have stated before, when you ask men who are dealing with the disease, they virtually all think their treatment either saved their life or was given too late – illustrating the difference between a population and an individual view. The silver lining is that whether you are diagnosed with pca before you die or not, regardless of treatment choice, you are more likely to die from something else.

4 Comments

Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues

Shift work and PSA values


I just came across this article because the editors at Medscape send around interesting articles on prostate cancer when you sign up for them. It seems likely to me that this is not a red herring, but the accompanying editorial goes into the issues of more holistic prostate cancer screening – with the intent to try and figure out who might really benefit rather than just screening all men over age 50. If you could reduce the denominator in some way by eliminating men who have the “usual, non-threatening” “cancer” (with a nod to all the articles suggesting we should change the nomenclature for Gleason 3+3 disease), screening might make more sense and be of greater benefit. Until then, it’s still caveat emptor.

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

PCPT rides again – finasteride (proscar) to the rescue?


Today’s NEJM has a great article written by our colleagues who headed this study designed to ask whether taking finasteride could reduce the incidence/death rate of prostate cancer. This is the same group that reported on fish oil being a risk as I have previously discussed. The main finding of the PCPT trial was that taking finasteride (Proscar™) could reduce the rate of prostate cancer, BUT that there were more high grade cancers in the group taking the drug compared to placebo. As a result of this finding (which has been the subject of extensive discussion and speculation…for example one analysis suggests that this is an artifact of making high grade cancers easier to find because the prostate volume shrinks by about 1/3 in men on finasteride), the FDA issued a warning against taking finasteride or dutasteride. In the article released today, the investigators reported on the long term outcome of the study. As usual, the results are creating much discussion, and differing points of view. Overall there was NO DIFFERENCE in the death rate among men taking finasteride vs. placebo. 78% of men in each group survived 15 years. Moreover, there was no difference in the death rate among men who did develop cancer regardless of whether they were on finasteride or placebo. The investigators suggest this means it is reasonable to take finasteride to reduce the incidence of men who must deal with a diagnosis. Of course another approach (favored by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force) is not to screen at all (remember all the patients in the trial were being screened by psa testing). Based on these considerations, I think it would be reasonable to recommend finasteride as a preventative in men who have a positive family history. Purists would point out that this has not been tested and would require a prospective trial before making such a recommendation. Where is Diogenes when we need him???

1 Comment

Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues

The American Urologic Association on Screening


The incredible blowback from various urologists who didn’t share the USPSTF guideline on screening has now been answered by the urologists (or at least their professional organization) themselves. In their just released guidelines, there is a more nuanced approach, but a clear recognition of the risks involved with screening, and adoption of an age-gated approach. Here are the core statements from their website:

Guideline Statement 1: The Panel recommends against PSA screening in men under age 40 years. (Recommendation; Evidence Strength Grade C)

  • In this age group there is a low prevalence of clinically detectable prostate cancer, no evidence demonstrating benefit of screening and likely the same harms of screening as in other age groups.

Guideline Statement 2: The Panel does not recommend routine screening in men between ages 40 to 54 years at average risk. (Recommendation; Evidence Strength Grade C)

  • For men younger than age 55 years at higher risk (e.g. positive family history or African American race), decisions regarding prostate cancer screening should be individualized.

Guideline Statement 3: For men ages 55 to 69 years the Panel recognizes that the decision to undergo PSA screening involves weighing the benefits of preventing prostate cancer mortality in 1 man for every 1,000 men screened over a decade against the known potential harms associated with screening and treatment. For this reason, the Panel strongly recommends shared decision-making for men age 55 to 69 years that are considering PSA screening, and proceeding based on a man’s values and preferences. (Standard; Evidence Strength Grade B)

  • The greatest benefit of screening appears to be in men ages 55 to 69 years.

Guideline Statement 4: To reduce the harms of screening, a routine screening interval of two years or more may be preferred over annual screening in those men who have participated in shared decision-making and decided on screening. As compared to annual screening, it is expected that screening intervals of two years preserve the majority of the benefits and reduce overdiagnosis and false positives. (Option; Evidence Strength Grade C)

  • Additionally, intervals for rescreening can be individualized by a baseline PSA level.

Guideline Statement 5: The Panel does not recommend routine PSA screening in men over age 70 years or any man with less than a 10 to 15 year life expectancy. (Recommendation; Evidence Strength Grade C)

  • Some men over age 70 years who are in excellent health may benefit from prostate cancer screening.

As I have stated elsewhere in this blog, screening is viewed differently by men who have already been found to have prostate cancer, for all kinds of reasons, not least because they wish they were in the happy group of men who are doing fine and may or may not need to be detected. (or they feel that screening saved their life or could have…)

The bottom line remains that the decision is individual, and that going through the pros and cons is not a short discussion in a family practice office, or even less in the line at the 9 Health Fair or similar. It will take you at least 15 minutes to read through the VERY thoughtful AUA statement, which is the best summary I have read in a long time.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized