Category Archives: Oligometastatic prostate cancer

Delaying metastatic disease – ASCO GU18

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Previously, we have discussed the conundrum of the rising PSA and when to start therapy. I also opined that for some men with a very slowly rising PSA, it might be best to just forget about it and enjoy life, comparing it to watching a clock, an opinion that understandably garnered negative comments from some. Of course the nuances surrounding PSA kinetics and their meaning are myriad. However, one graphic that helps understand this better is shown here.

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Smith, JCO 2013

This figure illustrates the fact that individuals with relatively long doubling times (>8-10 months) have a much lower risk of developing metastases or dying from prostate cancer than those with shorter doubling times. In a classic study published almost 2 decades ago, Pound et. al. followed a large number of patients who had rising PSAs following prostatectomy at Johns Hopkins. On average, men with rising PSA’s  who received no additional treatment, did not develop metastases for ~8 years. “In survival analysis, time to biochemical progression (P<.001), [i.e. the time from prostatectomy until PSA rise was detected] Gleason score (P<.001), and PSA doubling time (P<.001) were predictive of the probability and time to the development of metastatic disease.”

With these findings as a background, two studies were presented at the ASCO GU18 meeting, both involving use of improved analogues of bicalutamide (Casodex): enzalutamide (Xtandi) or apalutamide (Erleada). These drugs block the androgen receptor, thus preventing stimulation of prostate cancer growth, but are more potent than bicalutamide. Patients with rising PSA’s in spite of having low levels of testosterone from surgical (orchiectomy) or medical (GnRH agonists/antatgonists) castration, short doubling times (<10 months), but no metastases were treated either with apalutamide/placebo (SPARTAN trial) or enzalutamide/placebo (PROSPER trial). The trials were both remarkably positive in delaying the time to development of metastatic disease.

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SPARTAN TRIAL (Apalutamide)

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PROSPER TRIAL (Enzalutamide)

These are remarkable findings and great news for patients with the most aggressive forms of prostate cancer. However, there are (as usual) numerous questions raised by the trials, as was nicely discussed by Dr. Kantoff after the data were presented. These included a more careful analysis of the side effects and clinical benefits. Obviously patients are psychologically better off when they don’t have a rising PSA or metastases, but neither study reached statistical significance when it came to improved survival (both are trending in this direction). What are the side effects of being on such drugs for longer periods of time? In the enzalutamide study, there were more deaths from “other causes” – not pca within 3 months of progression. Why? In the apalutamide study there were more falls and fractures compared to placebo. Why? To these, I would add the issue of “pay me now or pay me later” – how much time/quality of life do you really lose by waiting until the first metastasis shows up, never mind the extraordinary costs (to patients, insurers, medicare, etc.) of remaining on these drugs for years. Further, neither study compared the outcome to using bicalutamide, the generic and much cheaper alternative anti-androgen, instead of placebo. And what about using the newer scans? All of the patients have metastatic disease, we just can’t see it until there are enough cells in one spot to turn a scan (e.g. fluciclovine or PSMA PET) positive. We can possibly gain advantages in staying off ADT of any sort in some patients by radiating oligometastatic disease. Nevertheless, these studies are great progress and landmarks in the fight against prostate cancer. Apalutamide became the first drug to be approved by the FDA for use in this setting with a “snap approval“. And I need to disclose that I am a paid advisor to J&J, although I have no personal stock in their company, and did not treat patients on either trial.


Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues, Oligometastatic prostate cancer, Prostate cancer therapy, Uncategorized

Rising PSA – When to start therapy

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One of the most frequent situations I encounter in my small “prostate cancer only” practice is a man who has had treatment (usually surgery or radiation) several years ago and now has a rising PSA. He feels absolutely fine, may be exercising daily, and his PSA is often so low that a routine scan won’t show anything. What to do?

The options in this situation are changing. Treating oligometastatic disease (few metastases) is somewhat of a new frontier in this situation. In the “old days” when I wrote about this subject, we reviewed the non-randomized data that suggested no advantage to starting ADT earlier. More recently, the idea of treating some men with radiation or surgery directed at the mets if they have only a few has become more popular. Added to this is the increased sensitivity of the newer PET scans (choline, acetate, PSMA targeted) that may reveal metastases even with PSA values less than 1.0. While it is hoped that some men could be cured by this approach, it is also possible that one could delay the implementation of ADT and its side effects. There are multiple ongoing clinical trials looking at this issue. With such rapidly changing technology, it will be difficult to come up with a “right choice” in every situation. What may have been considered “non-metastatic rising PSA” last year could become “oligometastatic” simply by the implementation of the new scans.

Beyond this is the issue of treatment-related side effects. In an article this week in Lancet Oncology, the side effects of treating men with asymptomatic, non-curable prostate cancer (TOAD and TROG studies) was reported. This study is one of the few randomized studies in this setting. The men were about 70 years old with rising PSA’s, most having been previously treated. They were randomized 1:1 to starting ADT immediately or waiting until at least 2 years later unless “symptoms or metastases developed or PSA doubling times decreased to 6 months or less”. Earlier, the investigators published the survival data in this study, indicating some advantage to starting earlier, as shown in this graph. Screen Shot 2017-09-12 at 9.14.48 PM

However, keep in mind that the men who were in the immediate ADT arm also experienced the ADT side effects sooner according to the new report. The most important areas of symptoms were the hot flashes and decreases in sexual activity (reported only in the men who were sexually active) which were significantly worse with the immediate treatment, as might be expected. In a “global quality of life” measurement there was also worse quality of life, although it was not significant (the score number was 72.39 for delayed therapy vs. 70.83 for the immediate group). Further, the type of ADT used varied, and included both intermittent and continuous therapy (usually intermittent therapy has at least some improvement in quality of life). Finally, none of the men in these studies received the newer (and vastly more expensive -but probably more effective) ADT agents, abiraterone or enzalutamide which have been shown to improve survival when used “up front” in the metastatic setting.

Thus, a rising PSA is obviously a reason for concern, but choosing a management strategy is quite complicated at the present time. The best news to come out of this study is that prostate cancer is a slow disease. “Overall, 18 (6%) men died from prostate cancer, 12 (8%) in the delayed treatment arm and six (4%) in the immediate arm…” This is not to say that as time goes on there will not be more prostate cancer deaths, and there was earlier metastatic progression in the delayed group, but it is equally important to realize that at age 70 there will be significant competing causes of mortality. Something will get us eventually, so the key is to not let prostate cancer (or the PSA) dominate our thinking. What other things can you work on? Stop smoking. Exercise. Improve your diet. And most of all, enjoy each day as a gift and live it to the fullest regardless of how you decide to deal with a rising PSA.


Filed under General Prostate Cancer Issues, Oligometastatic prostate cancer, Prostate cancer therapy